Replica of the Golden Crown


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Replica of the Golden Crown

 

This is thought to be a ritual vessel which was used in the memorial ceremony for ancestors.

On the clay base stands a horse that has two short spouts. One, which is quite short, is on the haunch of the horse, and the other, longer spout is on the horse's breast. If we pour water into the longer spout, it will come out of the longer spout on the chest. The legs of the horse look rather short and stocky, but the head has been molded very realistically. The man riding on the horse must be a nobleman of the Shilla dynasty, judging by such luxurious things as his three-cornered hat, pants made of deerskin and the finely-decorated horse.

The other man standing beside the horse is wearing a tall conical hat. He has a piece of toweling tied around the topknot in his hair. In his hand, he is carrying a (percussion) wood-block. From all this, we might suppose that he is a trusted servant who is leading the way for his master.

The meaning of this is that the horseman will ascend into the sky for the dead, and it also symbolizes the translation of the dead to heaven.

Although it has been commonly assumed that this is a toy, it must be a ritual vessel along the same pattern as other animal earthenware. In other words, it is hollow inside, and the spouts, which make it look like flask, are similar to those on other animal earthenware. This animal earthenware first came to light in the Gaya Area, but this mounted-warrior flask can be placed in the Shilla period.

Many replicas have been made of horseman flasks of this kind, especially in the Folk Crafts Village.

Further information: Folk Crafts Village (054) 746 - 7207

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