Ceramics of the Shilla Dynasty


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Ceramics of the Shilla Dynasty

 

Shilla earthenware was first produced around the first century BC and was in use for the next thousand years. It was made from clay that was widely distributed in the Kyoungju area. Most Shilla earthenware was fired at a high temperature of 1000им C, leaving it with a grayish-blue tinge. Some, however, has a different appearance because it was first coated with the natural oil of pine needles, which burned to ashes in the firing process.

The types of Shilla pottery vary with their uses. Everyday types include Jangyungho, Gobae, Gakbae and Youngbae. ('Bae' means cup.) Golho was used for the dead, while the Shingu type, Cha type and horseman flask type ceramics were of the finest quality.

Thousands of these fine ceramics have been found in the tombs of Shilla kings, such as Chenmachong, Hwangnamdaechong, and Geumgwanchong. Accordingly, many royal tombs in Kyoungju are looked upon as treasuries of ceramics. The skills used in making these Shilla pots show a high degree of originality and creativity and had great influence on Japanese Seuhyechi earthenware in the middle of the fifth century AD. Today, reproductions of Shilla earthenware are widely made.

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